Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Knitting and Reading on Wednesday


Really nothing new to share this week as far as knitting goes as I am putting the finishing touches on the Modern Baby Bonnet and almost ready to start the arm holes on the Plain Vest - these are my two favorite things to knit right now.

I am looking for a simple yet elegant hat pattern and scarf or cowl pattern to knit for Christmas gifts and would love suggestions - but I generally use two needles and prefer something that doesn't need too much counting.  Any ideas?

I borrowed this book from the library as I have an interest in researching how the full time small farmers of years ago could make a decent living farming -  or did they not?  I see these beautiful wooden farm homes (often in  a state of disrepair these days) and giant barns (often nearly falling down) and can't help but wonder what life was like for these farm families during the time when they could afford to build such beautiful structures.

Looking forward to all of the sharing today with Ginny and everyone else.

Warm wishes,
Tonya

18 comments:

  1. Take a look at this one! It is lovely!

    http://www.pickles.no/pickles/2012/11/4/god-morgen-hals-good-morning-cowl.html

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    1. Hi Matty,
      Thanks so much for sharing. This looks beautiful.
      Warmly,
      Tonya

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  2. The book looks really interesting! I often think about that myself, how were people able to live and make a living back then. But, I think that there were so many less "requirements" for living. It was more about providing food for their families and having a place to live, and less about having a car, or the internet, or cable etc. There seem to be a lot of things these days that we "need" in order to function in society that weren't even on the horizon back then.

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  3. That yarn looks so enjoyable to knit with!

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  4. The bonnet looks so warm and fuzzy, Tonya!

    I'm working on a scarf right now that works flat. The stitch pattern is the same on both sides, so it becomes part of your muscle memory after a few rows. :) You could easily stop at cowl length (about 22") and add button holes or sew the ends together.

    Here's the link:

    http://www.yarnharlot.ca/blog/archives/2006/10/12/one_row_handspun_scarf.html

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  5. you knits look so cozy. the book sounds really interesting. it is pretty amazing how people use to be able to love on farms like that.

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  6. Your knits look lovely, I really like the baby bonnet and know it will look so sweet on a wee little head.
    I am not sure of a flat hat pattern, but will keep a look out for you. I love browsing patterns so that will give me something to do this evening, I'll be back in touch.

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  7. Your knitting looks so soft and warm.
    Falling down old farms make me quite sad, they always make me think about who built them and how proud they must have been when they were finished and new.

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  8. The bonnet is lovely! I will be adding the book to my reading list.

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  9. i hope you find the right pattern, it's always a good feeling to know you have one that you love. the baby knits are just lovely.

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  10. I love the colors of those yarns--so pretty!
    New England farms of yesteryear were mostly subsistence operations, even in the more fertile valleys. The houses are large and beautiful because wood was abundant, and because most had a hired hand (often an immigrant farmer) living full time with the family as well as a few more packed in during haying and harvest time. Also families could be large. The houses weren't insulated and most of the heat went up the chimney. (My family had one of those old houses and so did both sets of grandparents.) The kitchens had no conveniences, and the "little house out back" was common until the 1950's. In addition to farming, my grandfather used his work horses to skid logs for the lumber company seasonally, and my grandmother worked two days a week as the town librarian, wrote a column for the regional newspaper, and sold cut flowers and house plants--all so they could hang onto the farm and keep their children in feed sack underwear! I'm in awe of all that both sets of grandparents were able to accomplish in a day. They certainly put me to shame!

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  11. Hi Tonya,

    I made several of these last year as Christmas gifts:
    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/birthday-cake-cowl

    My criteria was much the same as yours!

    Also this:
    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/blue-leaf-headband

    Happy knitting!

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  12. Lovely knits and your books sounds awesome.

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  13. That bonnet looks so cozy! I'll be sure to let you know if I spy any patterns that might work for you. I'll be on the look out. :)

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  14. Big houses were possible as wood was cheap,there were no building codes,and communites would often come together for a work bee, such as a barn raising. Farm hand were paid a pitance, children were used as labour (and often pulled out of school for this reason), Orphans were often used as labour (My grandfather-in-law was a home-child and abused terribly) and the work days were very long and filled with a variety of chores pretty much year round.
    People didn't have as many clothes, gadgets, hobbies, or toys as they do today. They used and reused materials (ie. flour sack dresses, worn clothing went into quilts and rag rugs, etc...) Some items were cheaper to purchase, as there were no guarenteed wages, job security or unions to affect the prices). It was a simpler time in some ways, but not necesarily a safer time.

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  15. Another pattern idea: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/blackberry-scarf-2

    Tonya, thank you again for sharing this inspiring blog! :-)

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